Photograph of child labeled “Little Whitley, Ernskoep Hospital, Downsborough, 1921”
Notes on photograph are as follows: “Suffers from a hereditary deformity known as Dourif’s Reptilia.” and “Patient will develop further disfigurements and, around puberty(?), a pronounced snake-like voice due to compression of the larynx caused by the Glans Bradley, a pharangeal(?) growth found in sufferers.”
Research indicates that, in fact, there were several dozen such sufferers dating from the late 18th century to well into the 20th, though their “condition” is disputed. The modern actor, Brad Dourif, to whom these children bear startling resemblances, claims to suffer from a disease unrecognized by any national medical association or clinical body, one he refers to as “spaciohronological displacement disorder” whereby he is randomly removed from his present location in both time and space and relocated to another. The locations and times vary wildly, but, he claims, the lengths of time he is gone do not: Mr. Dourif attests that he is “displaced” for precisely three months, two days, seven hours, forty-four minutes, and one second before being returned to the present, or, rather, the exact moment after he was “displaced”. During these trips, of which there have been hundreds, Mr. Dourif claims he has had intercourse with several women and that these “sufferers” are merely his own children. When asked about the terminology used to describe the disease, which was first identified in the early 20th century, Mr. Dourif was without explanation.
Further research has revealed, however, that the head physician at Ernskoep Hospital was a woman by the name of Lillian Basq. Dr. Basq left the hospital in 1923 along with her son, ostensibly to practice in rural Clanxtron County. It is likely, if Mr. Dourif’s stories are accurate, that Dr. Basq and he had a brief sexual relationship and, upon his return to the present, treated their affair’s “result” as a diseased child, perhaps as a way to cope with the disappearance of her lover, the boy’s father. An elderly resident of Clanxtron County claims that after Dr. Basq arrived she served as the area’s veterinarian until her death in 1976 from an apparent drowning accident, but was never seen with a child.
When contacted for a response to this hypothesis, Mr. Dourif could not be reached and has been incommunicado for almost six weeks.

Photograph of child labeled “Little Whitley, Ernskoep Hospital, Downsborough, 1921”

Notes on photograph are as follows: “Suffers from a hereditary deformity known as Dourif’s Reptilia.” and “Patient will develop further disfigurements and, around puberty(?), a pronounced snake-like voice due to compression of the larynx caused by the Glans Bradley, a pharangeal(?) growth found in sufferers.”

Research indicates that, in fact, there were several dozen such sufferers dating from the late 18th century to well into the 20th, though their “condition” is disputed. The modern actor, Brad Dourif, to whom these children bear startling resemblances, claims to suffer from a disease unrecognized by any national medical association or clinical body, one he refers to as “spaciohronological displacement disorder” whereby he is randomly removed from his present location in both time and space and relocated to another. The locations and times vary wildly, but, he claims, the lengths of time he is gone do not: Mr. Dourif attests that he is “displaced” for precisely three months, two days, seven hours, forty-four minutes, and one second before being returned to the present, or, rather, the exact moment after he was “displaced”. During these trips, of which there have been hundreds, Mr. Dourif claims he has had intercourse with several women and that these “sufferers” are merely his own children. When asked about the terminology used to describe the disease, which was first identified in the early 20th century, Mr. Dourif was without explanation.

Further research has revealed, however, that the head physician at Ernskoep Hospital was a woman by the name of Lillian Basq. Dr. Basq left the hospital in 1923 along with her son, ostensibly to practice in rural Clanxtron County. It is likely, if Mr. Dourif’s stories are accurate, that Dr. Basq and he had a brief sexual relationship and, upon his return to the present, treated their affair’s “result” as a diseased child, perhaps as a way to cope with the disappearance of her lover, the boy’s father. An elderly resident of Clanxtron County claims that after Dr. Basq arrived she served as the area’s veterinarian until her death in 1976 from an apparent drowning accident, but was never seen with a child.

When contacted for a response to this hypothesis, Mr. Dourif could not be reached and has been incommunicado for almost six weeks.